Dontay Moch by Justin

Known as one of the fastest OLB’s in the draft, Dontay Moch truly has “moch” speed at OLB and it certainly has drawn the attention of scouts all around the league and even the Internet scouts like myself. At only 6’2 229 there is concern just to what Moch will be able to play at the next level, but when you watch him his game screams 3-4 OLB. Now he has his flaws as well and they are shown, but he also is one great athlete and the guy who has the frame and work ethic to be a successful player and bodes to be one of those guys you take in the middle rounds and develop into a starter.

Lets first get to the positives and break down of what he does well. First off I’m going to put this part in caps because I feel its necessary, DONTAY MOCH MAKES PLAYS! Moch has put up a ridiculous amount of TFL the past 2 years and has been a player that teams have keyed on and game-planned for. Also when you watch Moch you see the speed and its ridiculous to watch because once the ball is snapped, he’s already making a move on the OT and getting around him. Now sometimes that speed gets him caught into bad situations, but like its been said before “you can’t teach speed.” Now Aaron Aloysius has a few good cutups of Moch that show off the potential for him

The first was from 2009 against Missouri facing the now #1 QB in the draft Blaine Gabbert and the 2nd was from this year against Boise State when Nevada took down the Broncos. The difference you see in him from 2009 to 2010 is astronomical personally. One thing I’ve loved about him this year is that Nevada has stood him up more as an LB and used him as an ILB/OLB hybrid type player for them but also let him rush the passer and make plays. That type of skill set he has bodes well for us as a prospect because we like guys who are able to make plays. Also since we are implementing a scheme a lot like Pittsburgh, a player like Moch can be a huge factor to add to the defense a lot like Lawrence Timmons has been for Pittsburgh as well. The other big thing you noticed with Moch is that he uses his speed and people now have joked calling it “moch” speed. Its something you love in a player and I feel like a broken record mentioning it twice now in 2 paragraphs but its something you covet especially with a 3-4 OLB type. Also the other thing I’ve noticed is that when he was in coverage he made a play or two, which as a scout makes you, wonder can he make the full adjustment to the OLB position? Or does he become more a hybrid? It’s a tough question and I’ll dive more into that on his actual projection for the Redskins. One last thing I want to mention with his positives is that he’s got the frame to add some more bulk on him. While he’s only at 229 right now I think if he got to 235 or 240 and kept his speed, he could become a force and someone you rotate in on 3rd downs and let him get after the QB, which could be a huge pickup for our defense.

While I’m a big fan of Moch, the guy does have his flaws and drawbacks that give me pause. I’ve talked about the speed and it will continue to be discussed, but he almost relies on his speed too much as a player. Part of it is the college game and people rely on the speed to make plays, but he uses it too frequently without really developing a good move or two. Now its not to say he can’t develop a move that makes him dominant, just says that he’s got to develop something or else he’s going to be someone who gets engulfed by OT’s easily as they can match-up with his speed. Also the other thing that really stands out is the size, 229 is a small weight for an OLB especially in the NFL and makes it really hard to project at the next level. One thing I did notice in the tape that had him in coverage was that he looked a little stiff in coverage, I don’t know if it was the fact he was just not used to turning and running but when he rushes the passer he’s very fluid and makes plays, but in coverage he looked a little out of it. Now he certainly can develop and become a better coverage guy, but at the same time do the coaches want to put up with that? Or do they want a guy they can trust to come in and play coverage responsibilities? That’s the debate that will occur with Moch because there are many different questions about Moch but if a team wants to make the move for him, they also need to have patience to develop and groom him. I personally would play him on ST early on and play him sparingly at the OLB position while he developed a coverage ability and pass-rushing move and then in year 2 let the man loose on opposing offenses. It’s very much like the way Mike Shanahan does things, where he finds these guys to play on Special Teams early on and then moves them to either offense or defense. He did it with that guy named Terrell Davis and it turned out pretty well for them.

Now lets get down to the nitty gritty with Moch, where does he project to the Washington Redskins? Personally I see him a lot like a Lawrence Timmons type player for us, one we rotate around between ILB and OLB and use him in match up situations to exploit his explosiveness. He’s got the tools to be a very good player for us, but at the same time we also will need to be patient with him and develop him and in the end reap the benefits. Moch is one of my favorite players in this draft and he’s been getting love lately from draft niks and it’ll certainly be interesting to watch him over the course of the off season and watch his draft stock. Right now I see him as a solid 3rd round pick but if he blows the doors off the combine then he could very well end up in the late 2nd range, as I really can’t see him struggling at the combine where he’s expected to do very well. Overall, Moch is one of those guys you want to keep an eye on moving forward the rest of the offense and see if a team like Washington takes a good hard look at him and maybe drafts him.

Justin P.

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A blog dedicated to the Washington Redskins and NFL Draft analysis.
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